‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media Edge Hill University, UK     Day 1, Friday 13th May 2016   TIME SESSION VENUE 8.30 – 9.00 Registration & Refreshments Business School Foyer 9.00 – 9.30 Welcome address B001 9.30 – 11.00 Parallel Sessions: Panels 1 & 2 Panel 1: Form, Format and Short Story Publishing B002 Narrative Empathetic Writing Devices: A Study of Short Fiction Formatting. Amanda Bigler (Loughborough University, UK) Embracing Modes: How the children of this century have employed the online publisher. Lisa Blower (independent scholar, UK) Does the Short Story exist? George Green (Lancaster University, UK)   Panel 2:Read More →

  http://blogs.chi.ac.uk/shortstoryforum/features-competition/ FREE ENTRY 750 to 2,000 words. £500 first prize, plus 2x runner-up prizes £100 each Deadline: 06 March 2016, 11:59pm (GMT). Calling for feature essays on the short story form, either recommending a short story, collection or anthology, or profiling the life and writing of a short story writer. We look, above all, at the quality of prose, the insights offered, and your ability to really hook your readers. The focus must be on the short story form (short stories, though, are not eligible for entry).Read More →

Society for the Study of the American Short Story  Call for Papers  The American Short Story: An Expansion of the Genre  A Symposium of the American Literature Association The Society for the Study of the American Short Story (SSASS) requests proposals for papers and presentations at an international symposium on the short story to be held in Savannah, October 20-22, 2016, at the Hyatt Hotel. More information regarding hotel reservations, keynote speakers, and registrations details will be available in the spring of 2016 and will be posted on the new Society website: americanshortstory.org.Read More →

‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016: deadline for proposals extended to January 31st 2016. Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; in the last thirty years theRead More →

Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations 20-21 November 2015, University of Angers, France Edge Hill University, University of Leuven, University of Le Mans, University of Nantes, University of Angers and the European Network for Short Fiction Research Friday 20 November 2015 9 a.m. registration 9.30 – 11 a.m. PANELS 1, 2 Panel 1: Maternal Ghosts ¡ Frida Kahlo room Helen E. Mundler, Université Paris-Est Créteil The maternal impulse as ghost: three hauntings in contemporary women’s fiction: A.S. Byatt, Fay Weldon, Alison Lurie Pascale Tollance, Université de Lyon 2 A Writer’s Ghosts: The Spectre of Matricide in A.S Byatt’s “The Changeling” Leslie de Bont, UniversitéRead More →

Call for Papers ‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media A conference of the European Network for Short Fiction Research Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016 Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; inRead More →

CONSTRUCTING COHERENCE IN THE BRITISH SHORT STORY CYCLE 15-16 October 2015 Johannes Gutenberg University (Mainz, Germany) Patrick Alasdair Gill (Mainz) and Florian Kläger (Würzburg) While the American short story cycle has recently been the object of extensive critical discussion, the same can hardly be said of its British counterpart. Still, thematically unified short story cycles would appear to constitute an established feature of the British literary landscape: recent specimens include Graham Swift’s Learning to Swim, Salman Rushdie’s East, West, Julian Barnes’s Cross Channel, Adam Thorpe’s Shifts, Sara Maitland’s Moss Witch, A. L. Kennedy’s What Becomes, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nocturnes. By reference to these and otherRead More →