‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016: deadline for proposals extended to January 31st 2016. Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; in the last thirty years theRead More →

Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations 20-21 November 2015, University of Angers, France Edge Hill University, University of Leuven, University of Le Mans, University of Nantes, University of Angers and the European Network for Short Fiction Research Friday 20 November 2015 9 a.m. registration 9.30 – 11 a.m. PANELS 1, 2 Panel 1: Maternal Ghosts ¡ Frida Kahlo room Helen E. Mundler, Université Paris-Est Créteil The maternal impulse as ghost: three hauntings in contemporary women’s fiction: A.S. Byatt, Fay Weldon, Alison Lurie Pascale Tollance, Université de Lyon 2 A Writer’s Ghosts: The Spectre of Matricide in A.S Byatt’s “The Changeling” Leslie de Bont, UniversitéRead More →

Call for Papers ‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media A conference of the European Network for Short Fiction Research Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016 Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; inRead More →

CONSTRUCTING COHERENCE IN THE BRITISH SHORT STORY CYCLE 15-16 October 2015 Johannes Gutenberg University (Mainz, Germany) Patrick Alasdair Gill (Mainz) and Florian Kläger (Würzburg) While the American short story cycle has recently been the object of extensive critical discussion, the same can hardly be said of its British counterpart. Still, thematically unified short story cycles would appear to constitute an established feature of the British literary landscape: recent specimens include Graham Swift’s Learning to Swim, Salman Rushdie’s East, West, Julian Barnes’s Cross Channel, Adam Thorpe’s Shifts, Sara Maitland’s Moss Witch, A. L. Kennedy’s What Becomes, and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Nocturnes. By reference to these and otherRead More →

TABLE OF CONTENTS  Michelle Ryan-Sautour and Gérald Préher Foreword Bertrand Cardin Introduction PART ONE: TRACES OF ORAL TRADITION: VOICES, DIALOGUES AND CONVERSATIONS Marie Mianowski Skipping and Gasping, Sighing and Hoping in Colum McCann’s “Aisling”: The Making of a Poet Catherine Conan Narration as Conversation: Patterns of Community-making in Colm Tóibín’s The Empty Family Eoghan Smith “Elemental and Plain”: Story-Telling in Claire Keegan’s Walk the Blue FieldsRead More →

Call for Papers Haunting in Short Fiction and Its Adaptations 20-21 November 2015, University of Angers, France (in collaboration with Edge Hill University, University of Leuven, University of Le Mans, and University of Nantes) There is a long tradition of haunting in short fiction, often appearing in the form of ghost stories, folk tales, fairy tales, and legends. Short narrative indeed appears to embrace the supernatural. Elizabeth Bowen explains, for example, in the preface to A Day in the Dark and Other Stories that while she uses “the supernatural” in her short stories, she considers it “unethical’ to do so in a novel. In “TheRead More →

Call For Papers: (Deadline 1 March 2015) Short fiction writers with a theory: re-reading short fiction theory through the lens of new writing and new media  11-12 June 2015, Université Catholique de Lille, France (In collaboration with the University of Angers, France and the European Network for Short Fiction Research) We are all familiar with the writings of James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, Frank O’Connor, Ernest Hemingway, Raymond Carver, and Flannery O’Connor on the short story. Their fiction has often been studied through the lens of their own critical essays, now considered essential elements in the heritage of short story criticism. The history of the shortRead More →