‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media Edge Hill University, UK     Day 1, Friday 13th May 2016   TIME SESSION VENUE 8.30 – 9.00 Registration & Refreshments Business School Foyer 9.00 – 9.30 Welcome address B001 9.30 – 11.00 Parallel Sessions: Panels 1 & 2 Panel 1: Form, Format and Short Story Publishing B002 Narrative Empathetic Writing Devices: A Study of Short Fiction Formatting. Amanda Bigler (Loughborough University, UK) Embracing Modes: How the children of this century have employed the online publisher. Lisa Blower (independent scholar, UK) Does the Short Story exist? George Green (Lancaster University, UK)   Panel 2:Read More →

  http://blogs.chi.ac.uk/shortstoryforum/features-competition/ FREE ENTRY 750 to 2,000 words. £500 first prize, plus 2x runner-up prizes £100 each Deadline: 06 March 2016, 11:59pm (GMT). Calling for feature essays on the short story form, either recommending a short story, collection or anthology, or profiling the life and writing of a short story writer. We look, above all, at the quality of prose, the insights offered, and your ability to really hook your readers. The focus must be on the short story form (short stories, though, are not eligible for entry).Read More →

‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016: deadline for proposals extended to January 31st 2016. Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; in the last thirty years theRead More →

Call for Papers ‘The Child of the Century’: Reading and Writing Short Fiction Across Media A conference of the European Network for Short Fiction Research Edge Hill University, UK, May 13-14, 2016 Writing in 1936, Elizabeth Bowen said: ‘The short story is a young art; as we now know it, it is the child of this century. Poetic tautness and clarity are so essential to it that it may be said to stand at the edge of prose; in its use of action it is nearer to drama than to the novel. The cinema, itself busy with a technique, is of the same generation; inRead More →

WOMEN WRITING ACROSS CULTURES: PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE An international symposium at St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford Friday 26 September to Sunday 28 September 2014 This symposium aims to foster dialogue among researchers and practitioners dealing with women’s writing in a variety of fields: transnational writing and writing across cultures; writing across academic disciplines, across the humanities and social sciences, across the arts and sciences; encounters between the critical and the creative, the academic and the popular, art and life, history and life-writing, orality and literacy, collective and individual authorship, analysant and analyst; crossing temporal boundaries: women’s writing of the past impacting on the present,Read More →

Call for Papers: Affect and the Short Story (Cycle)  The Journal of the Short Story in English announces a call for papers for an upcoming special section—“Affect and the Short Story (Cycle)”  The guest editors are interested in papers addressing how the field of Affect Studies can help inform the ways we read short stories and the ways we theorize about formal and generic labels like the Short Story and, especially, the Short Story Cycle. We are also interested in papers that make use of short story or short story theory in ways that might inform our understanding of the transmission and operation of affectRead More →

Call for Articles for a special issue of the Journal of Short Stories in English devoted to D. H. Lawrence Guest editors: Christine Zaratsian (Aix-Marseille Université) and Shirley Bricout (Montpellier III) Transgressing Borders and Borderlines  This special issue aims at bringing into focus the patterns of transgression which map out borders and borderlines as well as in-between territories in D. H. Lawrence’s shorter fiction. The characters he stages within the boundaries of the stories evolve along patterns of harmony and discord which lead them to transgress limits as they “seek that invisible and promised territory, that country that does not exist but that [they bearRead More →